Ted Ollier - Sky Grid 2013-2014

Ollier_Sky Grid 2013-2014.jpg
Ollier_Sky Grid 2013-2014.jpg

Ted Ollier - Sky Grid 2013-2014

150.00

Archival inkjet print on paper, 18" x 24" unframed.

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Artist's statement:

The Sky Grid is a record of the daylight hours and the weather in a specific place north of Boston, but shows the interaction of axial tilt, seasons, and the orbit of the Earth all in one print. In late March of 2013, I attached a security camera to the balcony of my condo and aimed it at the sky. The camera was powered by a data cable that also connected it to the Internet. I arranged it so that it would take a photograph of the overhead sky every two minutes from 6 am to 9 pm every day, and on the vernal equinox, 20 March 2013, I set it going. 

Each horizontal line in the Sky Grid is a single day. Each individual square in that line is the color of the zenith sky at that moment in time. The square to the right is the color of the sky two minutes later. As you move rightward in the Sky Grid, you pass from sunrise through noon to sunset. As you move downward in the Sky Grid, the daylight hours get longer and longer... until you reach the summer solstice. Then the days start to shrink, contracting along a line until you reach the most constricted point of the hourglass--the winter solstice. Then you slowly come back toward the light, ending at the vernal equinox of 2014. 

And another skygrid is made.